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The FDA Was Wrong About Soy: Here’s What You Need to Know

The FDA Was Wrong About Soy: Here’s What You Need to Know

The Food and Drug Administration just released a statement admitting that, well… They were wrong. “We are proposing a rule to revoke a health claim,” said Susan Mayne, director of the FDA Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition, in the release. “For the first time, we have considered it necessary,” she explained, revealing that they have never taken back a claim like this before.

The previous claim held that soy, a popular plant-based protein and the building block of tofu, reduces the risk of heart disease in those who eat it. Soy-based products have been at liberty to flaunt this claim on their packaging, asserting that their food or drink can mitigate heart disease risk. Similar health claims are common not only with soy products, but with other foods, as well.

“Since 1990, the FDA has been responsible for evaluating health claims on packaged foods to ensure that they are rooted in strong science,” expressed Mayne. “To date, we have authorized 12 such health claims, such as the effect of calcium and vitamin D in helping to lower the risk of osteoporosis or certain fruits and vegetables to lower the risk of cancer.”

This claim, however, may have missed the mark. Evidently, as the American Heart Association pointed out in 2008, while soy does have a direct link with cholesterol, it’s a bit of a stretch to say that this correlation also extends to a reduction of heart disease risk.

The the Weston A. Price Foundation, a non-profit that promotes nutrition, called out the FDA in 2016 over the same claim, advising that the agency reevaluate the claim in light of more recent research.

Once this research was considered closely, the release concedes, “Our review of that evidence has led us to conclude that the relationship between soy protein and heart disease does not meet the rigorous standard for an FDA-authorized health claim.” Soy didn’t make the cut, and the FDA no longer feels comfortable with companies flaunting the potential benefit on packaging.

Of course, this doesn’t mean that soy increases risk of heart disease — or that soy is in any way bad for you. It simply doesn’t have as strong a tie to heart health as was previously thought. And that the FDA, thrilled about the health implications of soy products, jumped just one foot too far in its health claims’ assumptions.

While we're bummed soy won't guarantee you a lower risk, consider eating one of these foods to reduce your risk of heart disease instead.


What You Need to Know About Egg Safety

Fresh eggs, even those with clean, uncracked shells, may contain bacteria called Salmonella that can cause foodborne illness, often called “food poisoning.” FDA has put regulations in place to help prevent contamination of eggs on the farm and during shipping and storage, but consumers also play a key role in preventing illness linked to eggs. Protect yourself and your family by following these safe handling tips when buying, storing, preparing, and serving eggs—or foods that contain them.

What is Salmonella?

Salmonella, the name of a group of bacteria, is a common cause of food poisoning in the United States. Most people infected with Salmonella develop diarrhea, fever, abdominal cramps, and vomiting 12 to 72 hours after infection. Symptoms usually last 4 to 7 days and most people get better without treatment. However, in some people, the diarrhea may be so severe that they need to be hospitalized. In these patients, the Salmonella infection may spread from the intestines to the blood stream, and then to other body sites and can cause death unless the person is treated quickly with antibiotics. Certain people are at greater risk for severe illness and include children, older adults, pregnant women, and people with weakened immune systems (such as transplant patients and individuals with HIV/AIDS, cancer, and diabetes).

FDA requires all cartons of shell eggs that have not been treated to destroy Salmonella to carry this safe handling statement:

Safe Handling Instructions
To prevent illness from bacteria: keep eggs refrigerated, cook eggs until yolks are firm, and cook foods containing eggs thoroughly.

Eggs that have been treated to destroy Salmonella–by in-shell pasteurization, for example–are not required to carry safe handling instructions, but the labeling will usually say that they have been treated.

Buying

You can help keep eggs safe by making wise buying decisions at the grocery store.

  • Buy eggs only if sold from a refrigerator or refrigerated case.
  • Open the carton and make sure that the eggs are clean and the shells are not cracked.
  • Store promptly in a clean refrigerator at a temperature of 40° F or below. Use a refrigerator thermometer to check.
  • Store eggs in their original carton and use them within 3 weeks for best quality.

Storing

Proper storage of eggs can affect both quality and safety.

  • Use hard-cooked eggs (in the shell or peeled) within 1 week after cooking.
  • Use frozen eggs within 1 year. Eggs should not be frozen in their shells. To freeze whole eggs, beat yolks and whites together. Egg whites can also be frozen by themselves.
  • Refrigerate leftover cooked egg dishes and use within 3 to 4 days. When refrigerating a large amount of a hot egg-containing leftover, divide it into several shallow containers so it will cool quickly.

Preparing

Wash hands, utensils, equipment, and work surfaces with hot, soapy water before and after they come in contact with raw eggs and raw egg-containing foods.

  • Cook eggs until both the yolk and the white are firm. Scrambled eggs should not be runny.
  • Casseroles and other dishes containing eggs should be cooked to 160° F. Use a food thermometer to be sure.
  • For recipes that call for eggs that are raw or undercooked when the dish is served — like Caesar salad dressing and homemade ice cream — use either shell eggs that have been treated to destroy Salmonella, by pasteurization or another approved method, or pasteurized egg products.

Serving

Follow these serving guidelines for eggs and egg dishes.

  • Serve cooked eggs (such as hard-boiled eggs and fried eggs) and egg-containing foods (such as such as quiches and soufflés) immediately after cooking. Cooked eggs and egg dishes may be refrigerated for serving later but should be thoroughly reheated to 165° F before serving.
  • Never leave cooked eggs or egg dishes out of the refrigerator for more than 2 hours or for more than 1 hour when temperatures are above 90° F. Bacteria that can cause illness grow quickly at warm temperatures (between 40° F and 140° F).
  • For party planning, keep hot egg dishes hot and cold egg dishes cold:
    • Keep egg dishes refrigerated until time to serve.
    • Serve small platters of reheated egg dishes at a time to ensure the food stays at the proper temperature. Replenish as needed, or at least every 2 hours.
    • Keep cold egg dishes on ice if they are going to stay out longer than 2 hours.

    Transporting

    • For picnics, pack cooked eggs and egg dishes in an insulated cooler with enough ice or frozen gel packs to keep them cold. Transport the cooler in the passenger compartment of the car, not in the much warmer trunk. At the picnic area, put the cooler in the shade if possible and keep the lid closed as much as you can.
    • For school or work, pack cooked eggs with a small frozen gel pack or a frozen juice box.

    About Foodborne Illness

    Know the Symptoms

    Consuming dangerous foodborne bacteria will usually cause illness within 1 to 3 days of eating the contaminated food. However, sickness can also occur within 20 minutes or up to 6 weeks later. Although most people will recover from a foodborne illness within a short period of time, some can develop chronic, severe, or even life-threatening health problems. Foodborne illness can sometimes be confused with other illnesses that have similar symptoms. The symptoms of foodborne illness can include:

    • Vomiting, diarrhea, and abdominal pain
    • Flu-like symptoms, such as fever, headache, and body ache

    Take Action

    If you think that you or a family member has a foodborne illness, contact your healthcare provider immediately. Also, report the suspected foodborne illness to FDA in either of these ways:

    • Contact the Consumer Complaint Coordinator in your area.
    • Contact MedWatch, FDA’s Safety Information and Adverse Event Reporting Program:
      By Phone: 1-800-FDA-1088
      Online: File a voluntary report at http://www.fda.gov/medwatch

    What You Need to Know About Egg Safety

    Fresh eggs, even those with clean, uncracked shells, may contain bacteria called Salmonella that can cause foodborne illness, often called “food poisoning.” FDA has put regulations in place to help prevent contamination of eggs on the farm and during shipping and storage, but consumers also play a key role in preventing illness linked to eggs. Protect yourself and your family by following these safe handling tips when buying, storing, preparing, and serving eggs—or foods that contain them.

    What is Salmonella?

    Salmonella, the name of a group of bacteria, is a common cause of food poisoning in the United States. Most people infected with Salmonella develop diarrhea, fever, abdominal cramps, and vomiting 12 to 72 hours after infection. Symptoms usually last 4 to 7 days and most people get better without treatment. However, in some people, the diarrhea may be so severe that they need to be hospitalized. In these patients, the Salmonella infection may spread from the intestines to the blood stream, and then to other body sites and can cause death unless the person is treated quickly with antibiotics. Certain people are at greater risk for severe illness and include children, older adults, pregnant women, and people with weakened immune systems (such as transplant patients and individuals with HIV/AIDS, cancer, and diabetes).

    FDA requires all cartons of shell eggs that have not been treated to destroy Salmonella to carry this safe handling statement:

    Safe Handling Instructions
    To prevent illness from bacteria: keep eggs refrigerated, cook eggs until yolks are firm, and cook foods containing eggs thoroughly.

    Eggs that have been treated to destroy Salmonella–by in-shell pasteurization, for example–are not required to carry safe handling instructions, but the labeling will usually say that they have been treated.

    Buying

    You can help keep eggs safe by making wise buying decisions at the grocery store.

    • Buy eggs only if sold from a refrigerator or refrigerated case.
    • Open the carton and make sure that the eggs are clean and the shells are not cracked.
    • Store promptly in a clean refrigerator at a temperature of 40° F or below. Use a refrigerator thermometer to check.
    • Store eggs in their original carton and use them within 3 weeks for best quality.

    Storing

    Proper storage of eggs can affect both quality and safety.

    • Use hard-cooked eggs (in the shell or peeled) within 1 week after cooking.
    • Use frozen eggs within 1 year. Eggs should not be frozen in their shells. To freeze whole eggs, beat yolks and whites together. Egg whites can also be frozen by themselves.
    • Refrigerate leftover cooked egg dishes and use within 3 to 4 days. When refrigerating a large amount of a hot egg-containing leftover, divide it into several shallow containers so it will cool quickly.

    Preparing

    Wash hands, utensils, equipment, and work surfaces with hot, soapy water before and after they come in contact with raw eggs and raw egg-containing foods.

    • Cook eggs until both the yolk and the white are firm. Scrambled eggs should not be runny.
    • Casseroles and other dishes containing eggs should be cooked to 160° F. Use a food thermometer to be sure.
    • For recipes that call for eggs that are raw or undercooked when the dish is served — like Caesar salad dressing and homemade ice cream — use either shell eggs that have been treated to destroy Salmonella, by pasteurization or another approved method, or pasteurized egg products.

    Serving

    Follow these serving guidelines for eggs and egg dishes.

    • Serve cooked eggs (such as hard-boiled eggs and fried eggs) and egg-containing foods (such as such as quiches and soufflés) immediately after cooking. Cooked eggs and egg dishes may be refrigerated for serving later but should be thoroughly reheated to 165° F before serving.
    • Never leave cooked eggs or egg dishes out of the refrigerator for more than 2 hours or for more than 1 hour when temperatures are above 90° F. Bacteria that can cause illness grow quickly at warm temperatures (between 40° F and 140° F).
    • For party planning, keep hot egg dishes hot and cold egg dishes cold:
      • Keep egg dishes refrigerated until time to serve.
      • Serve small platters of reheated egg dishes at a time to ensure the food stays at the proper temperature. Replenish as needed, or at least every 2 hours.
      • Keep cold egg dishes on ice if they are going to stay out longer than 2 hours.

      Transporting

      • For picnics, pack cooked eggs and egg dishes in an insulated cooler with enough ice or frozen gel packs to keep them cold. Transport the cooler in the passenger compartment of the car, not in the much warmer trunk. At the picnic area, put the cooler in the shade if possible and keep the lid closed as much as you can.
      • For school or work, pack cooked eggs with a small frozen gel pack or a frozen juice box.

      About Foodborne Illness

      Know the Symptoms

      Consuming dangerous foodborne bacteria will usually cause illness within 1 to 3 days of eating the contaminated food. However, sickness can also occur within 20 minutes or up to 6 weeks later. Although most people will recover from a foodborne illness within a short period of time, some can develop chronic, severe, or even life-threatening health problems. Foodborne illness can sometimes be confused with other illnesses that have similar symptoms. The symptoms of foodborne illness can include:

      • Vomiting, diarrhea, and abdominal pain
      • Flu-like symptoms, such as fever, headache, and body ache

      Take Action

      If you think that you or a family member has a foodborne illness, contact your healthcare provider immediately. Also, report the suspected foodborne illness to FDA in either of these ways:

      • Contact the Consumer Complaint Coordinator in your area.
      • Contact MedWatch, FDA’s Safety Information and Adverse Event Reporting Program:
        By Phone: 1-800-FDA-1088
        Online: File a voluntary report at http://www.fda.gov/medwatch

      What You Need to Know About Egg Safety

      Fresh eggs, even those with clean, uncracked shells, may contain bacteria called Salmonella that can cause foodborne illness, often called “food poisoning.” FDA has put regulations in place to help prevent contamination of eggs on the farm and during shipping and storage, but consumers also play a key role in preventing illness linked to eggs. Protect yourself and your family by following these safe handling tips when buying, storing, preparing, and serving eggs—or foods that contain them.

      What is Salmonella?

      Salmonella, the name of a group of bacteria, is a common cause of food poisoning in the United States. Most people infected with Salmonella develop diarrhea, fever, abdominal cramps, and vomiting 12 to 72 hours after infection. Symptoms usually last 4 to 7 days and most people get better without treatment. However, in some people, the diarrhea may be so severe that they need to be hospitalized. In these patients, the Salmonella infection may spread from the intestines to the blood stream, and then to other body sites and can cause death unless the person is treated quickly with antibiotics. Certain people are at greater risk for severe illness and include children, older adults, pregnant women, and people with weakened immune systems (such as transplant patients and individuals with HIV/AIDS, cancer, and diabetes).

      FDA requires all cartons of shell eggs that have not been treated to destroy Salmonella to carry this safe handling statement:

      Safe Handling Instructions
      To prevent illness from bacteria: keep eggs refrigerated, cook eggs until yolks are firm, and cook foods containing eggs thoroughly.

      Eggs that have been treated to destroy Salmonella–by in-shell pasteurization, for example–are not required to carry safe handling instructions, but the labeling will usually say that they have been treated.

      Buying

      You can help keep eggs safe by making wise buying decisions at the grocery store.

      • Buy eggs only if sold from a refrigerator or refrigerated case.
      • Open the carton and make sure that the eggs are clean and the shells are not cracked.
      • Store promptly in a clean refrigerator at a temperature of 40° F or below. Use a refrigerator thermometer to check.
      • Store eggs in their original carton and use them within 3 weeks for best quality.

      Storing

      Proper storage of eggs can affect both quality and safety.

      • Use hard-cooked eggs (in the shell or peeled) within 1 week after cooking.
      • Use frozen eggs within 1 year. Eggs should not be frozen in their shells. To freeze whole eggs, beat yolks and whites together. Egg whites can also be frozen by themselves.
      • Refrigerate leftover cooked egg dishes and use within 3 to 4 days. When refrigerating a large amount of a hot egg-containing leftover, divide it into several shallow containers so it will cool quickly.

      Preparing

      Wash hands, utensils, equipment, and work surfaces with hot, soapy water before and after they come in contact with raw eggs and raw egg-containing foods.

      • Cook eggs until both the yolk and the white are firm. Scrambled eggs should not be runny.
      • Casseroles and other dishes containing eggs should be cooked to 160° F. Use a food thermometer to be sure.
      • For recipes that call for eggs that are raw or undercooked when the dish is served — like Caesar salad dressing and homemade ice cream — use either shell eggs that have been treated to destroy Salmonella, by pasteurization or another approved method, or pasteurized egg products.

      Serving

      Follow these serving guidelines for eggs and egg dishes.

      • Serve cooked eggs (such as hard-boiled eggs and fried eggs) and egg-containing foods (such as such as quiches and soufflés) immediately after cooking. Cooked eggs and egg dishes may be refrigerated for serving later but should be thoroughly reheated to 165° F before serving.
      • Never leave cooked eggs or egg dishes out of the refrigerator for more than 2 hours or for more than 1 hour when temperatures are above 90° F. Bacteria that can cause illness grow quickly at warm temperatures (between 40° F and 140° F).
      • For party planning, keep hot egg dishes hot and cold egg dishes cold:
        • Keep egg dishes refrigerated until time to serve.
        • Serve small platters of reheated egg dishes at a time to ensure the food stays at the proper temperature. Replenish as needed, or at least every 2 hours.
        • Keep cold egg dishes on ice if they are going to stay out longer than 2 hours.

        Transporting

        • For picnics, pack cooked eggs and egg dishes in an insulated cooler with enough ice or frozen gel packs to keep them cold. Transport the cooler in the passenger compartment of the car, not in the much warmer trunk. At the picnic area, put the cooler in the shade if possible and keep the lid closed as much as you can.
        • For school or work, pack cooked eggs with a small frozen gel pack or a frozen juice box.

        About Foodborne Illness

        Know the Symptoms

        Consuming dangerous foodborne bacteria will usually cause illness within 1 to 3 days of eating the contaminated food. However, sickness can also occur within 20 minutes or up to 6 weeks later. Although most people will recover from a foodborne illness within a short period of time, some can develop chronic, severe, or even life-threatening health problems. Foodborne illness can sometimes be confused with other illnesses that have similar symptoms. The symptoms of foodborne illness can include:

        • Vomiting, diarrhea, and abdominal pain
        • Flu-like symptoms, such as fever, headache, and body ache

        Take Action

        If you think that you or a family member has a foodborne illness, contact your healthcare provider immediately. Also, report the suspected foodborne illness to FDA in either of these ways:

        • Contact the Consumer Complaint Coordinator in your area.
        • Contact MedWatch, FDA’s Safety Information and Adverse Event Reporting Program:
          By Phone: 1-800-FDA-1088
          Online: File a voluntary report at http://www.fda.gov/medwatch

        What You Need to Know About Egg Safety

        Fresh eggs, even those with clean, uncracked shells, may contain bacteria called Salmonella that can cause foodborne illness, often called “food poisoning.” FDA has put regulations in place to help prevent contamination of eggs on the farm and during shipping and storage, but consumers also play a key role in preventing illness linked to eggs. Protect yourself and your family by following these safe handling tips when buying, storing, preparing, and serving eggs—or foods that contain them.

        What is Salmonella?

        Salmonella, the name of a group of bacteria, is a common cause of food poisoning in the United States. Most people infected with Salmonella develop diarrhea, fever, abdominal cramps, and vomiting 12 to 72 hours after infection. Symptoms usually last 4 to 7 days and most people get better without treatment. However, in some people, the diarrhea may be so severe that they need to be hospitalized. In these patients, the Salmonella infection may spread from the intestines to the blood stream, and then to other body sites and can cause death unless the person is treated quickly with antibiotics. Certain people are at greater risk for severe illness and include children, older adults, pregnant women, and people with weakened immune systems (such as transplant patients and individuals with HIV/AIDS, cancer, and diabetes).

        FDA requires all cartons of shell eggs that have not been treated to destroy Salmonella to carry this safe handling statement:

        Safe Handling Instructions
        To prevent illness from bacteria: keep eggs refrigerated, cook eggs until yolks are firm, and cook foods containing eggs thoroughly.

        Eggs that have been treated to destroy Salmonella–by in-shell pasteurization, for example–are not required to carry safe handling instructions, but the labeling will usually say that they have been treated.

        Buying

        You can help keep eggs safe by making wise buying decisions at the grocery store.

        • Buy eggs only if sold from a refrigerator or refrigerated case.
        • Open the carton and make sure that the eggs are clean and the shells are not cracked.
        • Store promptly in a clean refrigerator at a temperature of 40° F or below. Use a refrigerator thermometer to check.
        • Store eggs in their original carton and use them within 3 weeks for best quality.

        Storing

        Proper storage of eggs can affect both quality and safety.

        • Use hard-cooked eggs (in the shell or peeled) within 1 week after cooking.
        • Use frozen eggs within 1 year. Eggs should not be frozen in their shells. To freeze whole eggs, beat yolks and whites together. Egg whites can also be frozen by themselves.
        • Refrigerate leftover cooked egg dishes and use within 3 to 4 days. When refrigerating a large amount of a hot egg-containing leftover, divide it into several shallow containers so it will cool quickly.

        Preparing

        Wash hands, utensils, equipment, and work surfaces with hot, soapy water before and after they come in contact with raw eggs and raw egg-containing foods.

        • Cook eggs until both the yolk and the white are firm. Scrambled eggs should not be runny.
        • Casseroles and other dishes containing eggs should be cooked to 160° F. Use a food thermometer to be sure.
        • For recipes that call for eggs that are raw or undercooked when the dish is served — like Caesar salad dressing and homemade ice cream — use either shell eggs that have been treated to destroy Salmonella, by pasteurization or another approved method, or pasteurized egg products.

        Serving

        Follow these serving guidelines for eggs and egg dishes.

        • Serve cooked eggs (such as hard-boiled eggs and fried eggs) and egg-containing foods (such as such as quiches and soufflés) immediately after cooking. Cooked eggs and egg dishes may be refrigerated for serving later but should be thoroughly reheated to 165° F before serving.
        • Never leave cooked eggs or egg dishes out of the refrigerator for more than 2 hours or for more than 1 hour when temperatures are above 90° F. Bacteria that can cause illness grow quickly at warm temperatures (between 40° F and 140° F).
        • For party planning, keep hot egg dishes hot and cold egg dishes cold:
          • Keep egg dishes refrigerated until time to serve.
          • Serve small platters of reheated egg dishes at a time to ensure the food stays at the proper temperature. Replenish as needed, or at least every 2 hours.
          • Keep cold egg dishes on ice if they are going to stay out longer than 2 hours.

          Transporting

          • For picnics, pack cooked eggs and egg dishes in an insulated cooler with enough ice or frozen gel packs to keep them cold. Transport the cooler in the passenger compartment of the car, not in the much warmer trunk. At the picnic area, put the cooler in the shade if possible and keep the lid closed as much as you can.
          • For school or work, pack cooked eggs with a small frozen gel pack or a frozen juice box.

          About Foodborne Illness

          Know the Symptoms

          Consuming dangerous foodborne bacteria will usually cause illness within 1 to 3 days of eating the contaminated food. However, sickness can also occur within 20 minutes or up to 6 weeks later. Although most people will recover from a foodborne illness within a short period of time, some can develop chronic, severe, or even life-threatening health problems. Foodborne illness can sometimes be confused with other illnesses that have similar symptoms. The symptoms of foodborne illness can include:

          • Vomiting, diarrhea, and abdominal pain
          • Flu-like symptoms, such as fever, headache, and body ache

          Take Action

          If you think that you or a family member has a foodborne illness, contact your healthcare provider immediately. Also, report the suspected foodborne illness to FDA in either of these ways:

          • Contact the Consumer Complaint Coordinator in your area.
          • Contact MedWatch, FDA’s Safety Information and Adverse Event Reporting Program:
            By Phone: 1-800-FDA-1088
            Online: File a voluntary report at http://www.fda.gov/medwatch

          What You Need to Know About Egg Safety

          Fresh eggs, even those with clean, uncracked shells, may contain bacteria called Salmonella that can cause foodborne illness, often called “food poisoning.” FDA has put regulations in place to help prevent contamination of eggs on the farm and during shipping and storage, but consumers also play a key role in preventing illness linked to eggs. Protect yourself and your family by following these safe handling tips when buying, storing, preparing, and serving eggs—or foods that contain them.

          What is Salmonella?

          Salmonella, the name of a group of bacteria, is a common cause of food poisoning in the United States. Most people infected with Salmonella develop diarrhea, fever, abdominal cramps, and vomiting 12 to 72 hours after infection. Symptoms usually last 4 to 7 days and most people get better without treatment. However, in some people, the diarrhea may be so severe that they need to be hospitalized. In these patients, the Salmonella infection may spread from the intestines to the blood stream, and then to other body sites and can cause death unless the person is treated quickly with antibiotics. Certain people are at greater risk for severe illness and include children, older adults, pregnant women, and people with weakened immune systems (such as transplant patients and individuals with HIV/AIDS, cancer, and diabetes).

          FDA requires all cartons of shell eggs that have not been treated to destroy Salmonella to carry this safe handling statement:

          Safe Handling Instructions
          To prevent illness from bacteria: keep eggs refrigerated, cook eggs until yolks are firm, and cook foods containing eggs thoroughly.

          Eggs that have been treated to destroy Salmonella–by in-shell pasteurization, for example–are not required to carry safe handling instructions, but the labeling will usually say that they have been treated.

          Buying

          You can help keep eggs safe by making wise buying decisions at the grocery store.

          • Buy eggs only if sold from a refrigerator or refrigerated case.
          • Open the carton and make sure that the eggs are clean and the shells are not cracked.
          • Store promptly in a clean refrigerator at a temperature of 40° F or below. Use a refrigerator thermometer to check.
          • Store eggs in their original carton and use them within 3 weeks for best quality.

          Storing

          Proper storage of eggs can affect both quality and safety.

          • Use hard-cooked eggs (in the shell or peeled) within 1 week after cooking.
          • Use frozen eggs within 1 year. Eggs should not be frozen in their shells. To freeze whole eggs, beat yolks and whites together. Egg whites can also be frozen by themselves.
          • Refrigerate leftover cooked egg dishes and use within 3 to 4 days. When refrigerating a large amount of a hot egg-containing leftover, divide it into several shallow containers so it will cool quickly.

          Preparing

          Wash hands, utensils, equipment, and work surfaces with hot, soapy water before and after they come in contact with raw eggs and raw egg-containing foods.

          • Cook eggs until both the yolk and the white are firm. Scrambled eggs should not be runny.
          • Casseroles and other dishes containing eggs should be cooked to 160° F. Use a food thermometer to be sure.
          • For recipes that call for eggs that are raw or undercooked when the dish is served — like Caesar salad dressing and homemade ice cream — use either shell eggs that have been treated to destroy Salmonella, by pasteurization or another approved method, or pasteurized egg products.

          Serving

          Follow these serving guidelines for eggs and egg dishes.

          • Serve cooked eggs (such as hard-boiled eggs and fried eggs) and egg-containing foods (such as such as quiches and soufflés) immediately after cooking. Cooked eggs and egg dishes may be refrigerated for serving later but should be thoroughly reheated to 165° F before serving.
          • Never leave cooked eggs or egg dishes out of the refrigerator for more than 2 hours or for more than 1 hour when temperatures are above 90° F. Bacteria that can cause illness grow quickly at warm temperatures (between 40° F and 140° F).
          • For party planning, keep hot egg dishes hot and cold egg dishes cold:
            • Keep egg dishes refrigerated until time to serve.
            • Serve small platters of reheated egg dishes at a time to ensure the food stays at the proper temperature. Replenish as needed, or at least every 2 hours.
            • Keep cold egg dishes on ice if they are going to stay out longer than 2 hours.

            Transporting

            • For picnics, pack cooked eggs and egg dishes in an insulated cooler with enough ice or frozen gel packs to keep them cold. Transport the cooler in the passenger compartment of the car, not in the much warmer trunk. At the picnic area, put the cooler in the shade if possible and keep the lid closed as much as you can.
            • For school or work, pack cooked eggs with a small frozen gel pack or a frozen juice box.

            About Foodborne Illness

            Know the Symptoms

            Consuming dangerous foodborne bacteria will usually cause illness within 1 to 3 days of eating the contaminated food. However, sickness can also occur within 20 minutes or up to 6 weeks later. Although most people will recover from a foodborne illness within a short period of time, some can develop chronic, severe, or even life-threatening health problems. Foodborne illness can sometimes be confused with other illnesses that have similar symptoms. The symptoms of foodborne illness can include:

            • Vomiting, diarrhea, and abdominal pain
            • Flu-like symptoms, such as fever, headache, and body ache

            Take Action

            If you think that you or a family member has a foodborne illness, contact your healthcare provider immediately. Also, report the suspected foodborne illness to FDA in either of these ways:

            • Contact the Consumer Complaint Coordinator in your area.
            • Contact MedWatch, FDA’s Safety Information and Adverse Event Reporting Program:
              By Phone: 1-800-FDA-1088
              Online: File a voluntary report at http://www.fda.gov/medwatch

            What You Need to Know About Egg Safety

            Fresh eggs, even those with clean, uncracked shells, may contain bacteria called Salmonella that can cause foodborne illness, often called “food poisoning.” FDA has put regulations in place to help prevent contamination of eggs on the farm and during shipping and storage, but consumers also play a key role in preventing illness linked to eggs. Protect yourself and your family by following these safe handling tips when buying, storing, preparing, and serving eggs—or foods that contain them.

            What is Salmonella?

            Salmonella, the name of a group of bacteria, is a common cause of food poisoning in the United States. Most people infected with Salmonella develop diarrhea, fever, abdominal cramps, and vomiting 12 to 72 hours after infection. Symptoms usually last 4 to 7 days and most people get better without treatment. However, in some people, the diarrhea may be so severe that they need to be hospitalized. In these patients, the Salmonella infection may spread from the intestines to the blood stream, and then to other body sites and can cause death unless the person is treated quickly with antibiotics. Certain people are at greater risk for severe illness and include children, older adults, pregnant women, and people with weakened immune systems (such as transplant patients and individuals with HIV/AIDS, cancer, and diabetes).

            FDA requires all cartons of shell eggs that have not been treated to destroy Salmonella to carry this safe handling statement:

            Safe Handling Instructions
            To prevent illness from bacteria: keep eggs refrigerated, cook eggs until yolks are firm, and cook foods containing eggs thoroughly.

            Eggs that have been treated to destroy Salmonella–by in-shell pasteurization, for example–are not required to carry safe handling instructions, but the labeling will usually say that they have been treated.

            Buying

            You can help keep eggs safe by making wise buying decisions at the grocery store.

            • Buy eggs only if sold from a refrigerator or refrigerated case.
            • Open the carton and make sure that the eggs are clean and the shells are not cracked.
            • Store promptly in a clean refrigerator at a temperature of 40° F or below. Use a refrigerator thermometer to check.
            • Store eggs in their original carton and use them within 3 weeks for best quality.

            Storing

            Proper storage of eggs can affect both quality and safety.

            • Use hard-cooked eggs (in the shell or peeled) within 1 week after cooking.
            • Use frozen eggs within 1 year. Eggs should not be frozen in their shells. To freeze whole eggs, beat yolks and whites together. Egg whites can also be frozen by themselves.
            • Refrigerate leftover cooked egg dishes and use within 3 to 4 days. When refrigerating a large amount of a hot egg-containing leftover, divide it into several shallow containers so it will cool quickly.

            Preparing

            Wash hands, utensils, equipment, and work surfaces with hot, soapy water before and after they come in contact with raw eggs and raw egg-containing foods.

            • Cook eggs until both the yolk and the white are firm. Scrambled eggs should not be runny.
            • Casseroles and other dishes containing eggs should be cooked to 160° F. Use a food thermometer to be sure.
            • For recipes that call for eggs that are raw or undercooked when the dish is served — like Caesar salad dressing and homemade ice cream — use either shell eggs that have been treated to destroy Salmonella, by pasteurization or another approved method, or pasteurized egg products.

            Serving

            Follow these serving guidelines for eggs and egg dishes.

            • Serve cooked eggs (such as hard-boiled eggs and fried eggs) and egg-containing foods (such as such as quiches and soufflés) immediately after cooking. Cooked eggs and egg dishes may be refrigerated for serving later but should be thoroughly reheated to 165° F before serving.
            • Never leave cooked eggs or egg dishes out of the refrigerator for more than 2 hours or for more than 1 hour when temperatures are above 90° F. Bacteria that can cause illness grow quickly at warm temperatures (between 40° F and 140° F).
            • For party planning, keep hot egg dishes hot and cold egg dishes cold:
              • Keep egg dishes refrigerated until time to serve.
              • Serve small platters of reheated egg dishes at a time to ensure the food stays at the proper temperature. Replenish as needed, or at least every 2 hours.
              • Keep cold egg dishes on ice if they are going to stay out longer than 2 hours.

              Transporting

              • For picnics, pack cooked eggs and egg dishes in an insulated cooler with enough ice or frozen gel packs to keep them cold. Transport the cooler in the passenger compartment of the car, not in the much warmer trunk. At the picnic area, put the cooler in the shade if possible and keep the lid closed as much as you can.
              • For school or work, pack cooked eggs with a small frozen gel pack or a frozen juice box.

              About Foodborne Illness

              Know the Symptoms

              Consuming dangerous foodborne bacteria will usually cause illness within 1 to 3 days of eating the contaminated food. However, sickness can also occur within 20 minutes or up to 6 weeks later. Although most people will recover from a foodborne illness within a short period of time, some can develop chronic, severe, or even life-threatening health problems. Foodborne illness can sometimes be confused with other illnesses that have similar symptoms. The symptoms of foodborne illness can include:

              • Vomiting, diarrhea, and abdominal pain
              • Flu-like symptoms, such as fever, headache, and body ache

              Take Action

              If you think that you or a family member has a foodborne illness, contact your healthcare provider immediately. Also, report the suspected foodborne illness to FDA in either of these ways:

              • Contact the Consumer Complaint Coordinator in your area.
              • Contact MedWatch, FDA’s Safety Information and Adverse Event Reporting Program:
                By Phone: 1-800-FDA-1088
                Online: File a voluntary report at http://www.fda.gov/medwatch

              What You Need to Know About Egg Safety

              Fresh eggs, even those with clean, uncracked shells, may contain bacteria called Salmonella that can cause foodborne illness, often called “food poisoning.” FDA has put regulations in place to help prevent contamination of eggs on the farm and during shipping and storage, but consumers also play a key role in preventing illness linked to eggs. Protect yourself and your family by following these safe handling tips when buying, storing, preparing, and serving eggs—or foods that contain them.

              What is Salmonella?

              Salmonella, the name of a group of bacteria, is a common cause of food poisoning in the United States. Most people infected with Salmonella develop diarrhea, fever, abdominal cramps, and vomiting 12 to 72 hours after infection. Symptoms usually last 4 to 7 days and most people get better without treatment. However, in some people, the diarrhea may be so severe that they need to be hospitalized. In these patients, the Salmonella infection may spread from the intestines to the blood stream, and then to other body sites and can cause death unless the person is treated quickly with antibiotics. Certain people are at greater risk for severe illness and include children, older adults, pregnant women, and people with weakened immune systems (such as transplant patients and individuals with HIV/AIDS, cancer, and diabetes).

              FDA requires all cartons of shell eggs that have not been treated to destroy Salmonella to carry this safe handling statement:

              Safe Handling Instructions
              To prevent illness from bacteria: keep eggs refrigerated, cook eggs until yolks are firm, and cook foods containing eggs thoroughly.

              Eggs that have been treated to destroy Salmonella–by in-shell pasteurization, for example–are not required to carry safe handling instructions, but the labeling will usually say that they have been treated.

              Buying

              You can help keep eggs safe by making wise buying decisions at the grocery store.

              • Buy eggs only if sold from a refrigerator or refrigerated case.
              • Open the carton and make sure that the eggs are clean and the shells are not cracked.
              • Store promptly in a clean refrigerator at a temperature of 40° F or below. Use a refrigerator thermometer to check.
              • Store eggs in their original carton and use them within 3 weeks for best quality.

              Storing

              Proper storage of eggs can affect both quality and safety.

              • Use hard-cooked eggs (in the shell or peeled) within 1 week after cooking.
              • Use frozen eggs within 1 year. Eggs should not be frozen in their shells. To freeze whole eggs, beat yolks and whites together. Egg whites can also be frozen by themselves.
              • Refrigerate leftover cooked egg dishes and use within 3 to 4 days. When refrigerating a large amount of a hot egg-containing leftover, divide it into several shallow containers so it will cool quickly.

              Preparing

              Wash hands, utensils, equipment, and work surfaces with hot, soapy water before and after they come in contact with raw eggs and raw egg-containing foods.

              • Cook eggs until both the yolk and the white are firm. Scrambled eggs should not be runny.
              • Casseroles and other dishes containing eggs should be cooked to 160° F. Use a food thermometer to be sure.
              • For recipes that call for eggs that are raw or undercooked when the dish is served — like Caesar salad dressing and homemade ice cream — use either shell eggs that have been treated to destroy Salmonella, by pasteurization or another approved method, or pasteurized egg products.

              Serving

              Follow these serving guidelines for eggs and egg dishes.

              • Serve cooked eggs (such as hard-boiled eggs and fried eggs) and egg-containing foods (such as such as quiches and soufflés) immediately after cooking. Cooked eggs and egg dishes may be refrigerated for serving later but should be thoroughly reheated to 165° F before serving.
              • Never leave cooked eggs or egg dishes out of the refrigerator for more than 2 hours or for more than 1 hour when temperatures are above 90° F. Bacteria that can cause illness grow quickly at warm temperatures (between 40° F and 140° F).
              • For party planning, keep hot egg dishes hot and cold egg dishes cold:
                • Keep egg dishes refrigerated until time to serve.
                • Serve small platters of reheated egg dishes at a time to ensure the food stays at the proper temperature. Replenish as needed, or at least every 2 hours.
                • Keep cold egg dishes on ice if they are going to stay out longer than 2 hours.

                Transporting

                • For picnics, pack cooked eggs and egg dishes in an insulated cooler with enough ice or frozen gel packs to keep them cold. Transport the cooler in the passenger compartment of the car, not in the much warmer trunk. At the picnic area, put the cooler in the shade if possible and keep the lid closed as much as you can.
                • For school or work, pack cooked eggs with a small frozen gel pack or a frozen juice box.

                About Foodborne Illness

                Know the Symptoms

                Consuming dangerous foodborne bacteria will usually cause illness within 1 to 3 days of eating the contaminated food. However, sickness can also occur within 20 minutes or up to 6 weeks later. Although most people will recover from a foodborne illness within a short period of time, some can develop chronic, severe, or even life-threatening health problems. Foodborne illness can sometimes be confused with other illnesses that have similar symptoms. The symptoms of foodborne illness can include:

                • Vomiting, diarrhea, and abdominal pain
                • Flu-like symptoms, such as fever, headache, and body ache

                Take Action

                If you think that you or a family member has a foodborne illness, contact your healthcare provider immediately. Also, report the suspected foodborne illness to FDA in either of these ways:

                • Contact the Consumer Complaint Coordinator in your area.
                • Contact MedWatch, FDA’s Safety Information and Adverse Event Reporting Program:
                  By Phone: 1-800-FDA-1088
                  Online: File a voluntary report at http://www.fda.gov/medwatch

                What You Need to Know About Egg Safety

                Fresh eggs, even those with clean, uncracked shells, may contain bacteria called Salmonella that can cause foodborne illness, often called “food poisoning.” FDA has put regulations in place to help prevent contamination of eggs on the farm and during shipping and storage, but consumers also play a key role in preventing illness linked to eggs. Protect yourself and your family by following these safe handling tips when buying, storing, preparing, and serving eggs—or foods that contain them.

                What is Salmonella?

                Salmonella, the name of a group of bacteria, is a common cause of food poisoning in the United States. Most people infected with Salmonella develop diarrhea, fever, abdominal cramps, and vomiting 12 to 72 hours after infection. Symptoms usually last 4 to 7 days and most people get better without treatment. However, in some people, the diarrhea may be so severe that they need to be hospitalized. In these patients, the Salmonella infection may spread from the intestines to the blood stream, and then to other body sites and can cause death unless the person is treated quickly with antibiotics. Certain people are at greater risk for severe illness and include children, older adults, pregnant women, and people with weakened immune systems (such as transplant patients and individuals with HIV/AIDS, cancer, and diabetes).

                FDA requires all cartons of shell eggs that have not been treated to destroy Salmonella to carry this safe handling statement:

                Safe Handling Instructions
                To prevent illness from bacteria: keep eggs refrigerated, cook eggs until yolks are firm, and cook foods containing eggs thoroughly.

                Eggs that have been treated to destroy Salmonella–by in-shell pasteurization, for example–are not required to carry safe handling instructions, but the labeling will usually say that they have been treated.

                Buying

                You can help keep eggs safe by making wise buying decisions at the grocery store.

                • Buy eggs only if sold from a refrigerator or refrigerated case.
                • Open the carton and make sure that the eggs are clean and the shells are not cracked.
                • Store promptly in a clean refrigerator at a temperature of 40° F or below. Use a refrigerator thermometer to check.
                • Store eggs in their original carton and use them within 3 weeks for best quality.

                Storing

                Proper storage of eggs can affect both quality and safety.

                • Use hard-cooked eggs (in the shell or peeled) within 1 week after cooking.
                • Use frozen eggs within 1 year. Eggs should not be frozen in their shells. To freeze whole eggs, beat yolks and whites together. Egg whites can also be frozen by themselves.
                • Refrigerate leftover cooked egg dishes and use within 3 to 4 days. When refrigerating a large amount of a hot egg-containing leftover, divide it into several shallow containers so it will cool quickly.

                Preparing

                Wash hands, utensils, equipment, and work surfaces with hot, soapy water before and after they come in contact with raw eggs and raw egg-containing foods.

                • Cook eggs until both the yolk and the white are firm. Scrambled eggs should not be runny.
                • Casseroles and other dishes containing eggs should be cooked to 160° F. Use a food thermometer to be sure.
                • For recipes that call for eggs that are raw or undercooked when the dish is served — like Caesar salad dressing and homemade ice cream — use either shell eggs that have been treated to destroy Salmonella, by pasteurization or another approved method, or pasteurized egg products.

                Serving

                Follow these serving guidelines for eggs and egg dishes.

                • Serve cooked eggs (such as hard-boiled eggs and fried eggs) and egg-containing foods (such as such as quiches and soufflés) immediately after cooking. Cooked eggs and egg dishes may be refrigerated for serving later but should be thoroughly reheated to 165° F before serving.
                • Never leave cooked eggs or egg dishes out of the refrigerator for more than 2 hours or for more than 1 hour when temperatures are above 90° F. Bacteria that can cause illness grow quickly at warm temperatures (between 40° F and 140° F).
                • For party planning, keep hot egg dishes hot and cold egg dishes cold:
                  • Keep egg dishes refrigerated until time to serve.
                  • Serve small platters of reheated egg dishes at a time to ensure the food stays at the proper temperature. Replenish as needed, or at least every 2 hours.
                  • Keep cold egg dishes on ice if they are going to stay out longer than 2 hours.

                  Transporting

                  • For picnics, pack cooked eggs and egg dishes in an insulated cooler with enough ice or frozen gel packs to keep them cold. Transport the cooler in the passenger compartment of the car, not in the much warmer trunk. At the picnic area, put the cooler in the shade if possible and keep the lid closed as much as you can.
                  • For school or work, pack cooked eggs with a small frozen gel pack or a frozen juice box.

                  About Foodborne Illness

                  Know the Symptoms

                  Consuming dangerous foodborne bacteria will usually cause illness within 1 to 3 days of eating the contaminated food. However, sickness can also occur within 20 minutes or up to 6 weeks later. Although most people will recover from a foodborne illness within a short period of time, some can develop chronic, severe, or even life-threatening health problems. Foodborne illness can sometimes be confused with other illnesses that have similar symptoms. The symptoms of foodborne illness can include:

                  • Vomiting, diarrhea, and abdominal pain
                  • Flu-like symptoms, such as fever, headache, and body ache

                  Take Action

                  If you think that you or a family member has a foodborne illness, contact your healthcare provider immediately. Also, report the suspected foodborne illness to FDA in either of these ways:

                  • Contact the Consumer Complaint Coordinator in your area.
                  • Contact MedWatch, FDA’s Safety Information and Adverse Event Reporting Program:
                    By Phone: 1-800-FDA-1088
                    Online: File a voluntary report at http://www.fda.gov/medwatch

                  What You Need to Know About Egg Safety

                  Fresh eggs, even those with clean, uncracked shells, may contain bacteria called Salmonella that can cause foodborne illness, often called “food poisoning.” FDA has put regulations in place to help prevent contamination of eggs on the farm and during shipping and storage, but consumers also play a key role in preventing illness linked to eggs. Protect yourself and your family by following these safe handling tips when buying, storing, preparing, and serving eggs—or foods that contain them.

                  What is Salmonella?

                  Salmonella, the name of a group of bacteria, is a common cause of food poisoning in the United States. Most people infected with Salmonella develop diarrhea, fever, abdominal cramps, and vomiting 12 to 72 hours after infection. Symptoms usually last 4 to 7 days and most people get better without treatment. However, in some people, the diarrhea may be so severe that they need to be hospitalized. In these patients, the Salmonella infection may spread from the intestines to the blood stream, and then to other body sites and can cause death unless the person is treated quickly with antibiotics. Certain people are at greater risk for severe illness and include children, older adults, pregnant women, and people with weakened immune systems (such as transplant patients and individuals with HIV/AIDS, cancer, and diabetes).

                  FDA requires all cartons of shell eggs that have not been treated to destroy Salmonella to carry this safe handling statement:

                  Safe Handling Instructions
                  To prevent illness from bacteria: keep eggs refrigerated, cook eggs until yolks are firm, and cook foods containing eggs thoroughly.

                  Eggs that have been treated to destroy Salmonella–by in-shell pasteurization, for example–are not required to carry safe handling instructions, but the labeling will usually say that they have been treated.

                  Buying

                  You can help keep eggs safe by making wise buying decisions at the grocery store.

                  • Buy eggs only if sold from a refrigerator or refrigerated case.
                  • Open the carton and make sure that the eggs are clean and the shells are not cracked.
                  • Store promptly in a clean refrigerator at a temperature of 40° F or below. Use a refrigerator thermometer to check.
                  • Store eggs in their original carton and use them within 3 weeks for best quality.

                  Storing

                  Proper storage of eggs can affect both quality and safety.

                  • Use hard-cooked eggs (in the shell or peeled) within 1 week after cooking.
                  • Use frozen eggs within 1 year. Eggs should not be frozen in their shells. To freeze whole eggs, beat yolks and whites together. Egg whites can also be frozen by themselves.
                  • Refrigerate leftover cooked egg dishes and use within 3 to 4 days. When refrigerating a large amount of a hot egg-containing leftover, divide it into several shallow containers so it will cool quickly.

                  Preparing

                  Wash hands, utensils, equipment, and work surfaces with hot, soapy water before and after they come in contact with raw eggs and raw egg-containing foods.

                  • Cook eggs until both the yolk and the white are firm. Scrambled eggs should not be runny.
                  • Casseroles and other dishes containing eggs should be cooked to 160° F. Use a food thermometer to be sure.
                  • For recipes that call for eggs that are raw or undercooked when the dish is served — like Caesar salad dressing and homemade ice cream — use either shell eggs that have been treated to destroy Salmonella, by pasteurization or another approved method, or pasteurized egg products.

                  Serving

                  Follow these serving guidelines for eggs and egg dishes.

                  • Serve cooked eggs (such as hard-boiled eggs and fried eggs) and egg-containing foods (such as such as quiches and soufflés) immediately after cooking. Cooked eggs and egg dishes may be refrigerated for serving later but should be thoroughly reheated to 165° F before serving.
                  • Never leave cooked eggs or egg dishes out of the refrigerator for more than 2 hours or for more than 1 hour when temperatures are above 90° F. Bacteria that can cause illness grow quickly at warm temperatures (between 40° F and 140° F).
                  • For party planning, keep hot egg dishes hot and cold egg dishes cold:
                    • Keep egg dishes refrigerated until time to serve.
                    • Serve small platters of reheated egg dishes at a time to ensure the food stays at the proper temperature. Replenish as needed, or at least every 2 hours.
                    • Keep cold egg dishes on ice if they are going to stay out longer than 2 hours.

                    Transporting

                    • For picnics, pack cooked eggs and egg dishes in an insulated cooler with enough ice or frozen gel packs to keep them cold. Transport the cooler in the passenger compartment of the car, not in the much warmer trunk. At the picnic area, put the cooler in the shade if possible and keep the lid closed as much as you can.
                    • For school or work, pack cooked eggs with a small frozen gel pack or a frozen juice box.

                    About Foodborne Illness

                    Know the Symptoms

                    Consuming dangerous foodborne bacteria will usually cause illness within 1 to 3 days of eating the contaminated food. However, sickness can also occur within 20 minutes or up to 6 weeks later. Although most people will recover from a foodborne illness within a short period of time, some can develop chronic, severe, or even life-threatening health problems. Foodborne illness can sometimes be confused with other illnesses that have similar symptoms. The symptoms of foodborne illness can include:

                    • Vomiting, diarrhea, and abdominal pain
                    • Flu-like symptoms, such as fever, headache, and body ache

                    Take Action

                    If you think that you or a family member has a foodborne illness, contact your healthcare provider immediately. Also, report the suspected foodborne illness to FDA in either of these ways:

                    • Contact the Consumer Complaint Coordinator in your area.
                    • Contact MedWatch, FDA’s Safety Information and Adverse Event Reporting Program:
                      By Phone: 1-800-FDA-1088
                      Online: File a voluntary report at http://www.fda.gov/medwatch

                    What You Need to Know About Egg Safety

                    Fresh eggs, even those with clean, uncracked shells, may contain bacteria called Salmonella that can cause foodborne illness, often called “food poisoning.” FDA has put regulations in place to help prevent contamination of eggs on the farm and during shipping and storage, but consumers also play a key role in preventing illness linked to eggs. Protect yourself and your family by following these safe handling tips when buying, storing, preparing, and serving eggs—or foods that contain them.

                    What is Salmonella?

                    Salmonella, the name of a group of bacteria, is a common cause of food poisoning in the United States. Most people infected with Salmonella develop diarrhea, fever, abdominal cramps, and vomiting 12 to 72 hours after infection. Symptoms usually last 4 to 7 days and most people get better without treatment. However, in some people, the diarrhea may be so severe that they need to be hospitalized. In these patients, the Salmonella infection may spread from the intestines to the blood stream, and then to other body sites and can cause death unless the person is treated quickly with antibiotics. Certain people are at greater risk for severe illness and include children, older adults, pregnant women, and people with weakened immune systems (such as transplant patients and individuals with HIV/AIDS, cancer, and diabetes).

                    FDA requires all cartons of shell eggs that have not been treated to destroy Salmonella to carry this safe handling statement:

                    Safe Handling Instructions
                    To prevent illness from bacteria: keep eggs refrigerated, cook eggs until yolks are firm, and cook foods containing eggs thoroughly.

                    Eggs that have been treated to destroy Salmonella–by in-shell pasteurization, for example–are not required to carry safe handling instructions, but the labeling will usually say that they have been treated.

                    Buying

                    You can help keep eggs safe by making wise buying decisions at the grocery store.

                    • Buy eggs only if sold from a refrigerator or refrigerated case.
                    • Open the carton and make sure that the eggs are clean and the shells are not cracked.
                    • Store promptly in a clean refrigerator at a temperature of 40° F or below. Use a refrigerator thermometer to check.
                    • Store eggs in their original carton and use them within 3 weeks for best quality.

                    Storing

                    Proper storage of eggs can affect both quality and safety.

                    • Use hard-cooked eggs (in the shell or peeled) within 1 week after cooking.
                    • Use frozen eggs within 1 year. Eggs should not be frozen in their shells. To freeze whole eggs, beat yolks and whites together. Egg whites can also be frozen by themselves.
                    • Refrigerate leftover cooked egg dishes and use within 3 to 4 days. When refrigerating a large amount of a hot egg-containing leftover, divide it into several shallow containers so it will cool quickly.

                    Preparing

                    Wash hands, utensils, equipment, and work surfaces with hot, soapy water before and after they come in contact with raw eggs and raw egg-containing foods.

                    • Cook eggs until both the yolk and the white are firm. Scrambled eggs should not be runny.
                    • Casseroles and other dishes containing eggs should be cooked to 160° F. Use a food thermometer to be sure.
                    • For recipes that call for eggs that are raw or undercooked when the dish is served — like Caesar salad dressing and homemade ice cream — use either shell eggs that have been treated to destroy Salmonella, by pasteurization or another approved method, or pasteurized egg products.

                    Serving

                    Follow these serving guidelines for eggs and egg dishes.

                    • Serve cooked eggs (such as hard-boiled eggs and fried eggs) and egg-containing foods (such as such as quiches and soufflés) immediately after cooking. Cooked eggs and egg dishes may be refrigerated for serving later but should be thoroughly reheated to 165° F before serving.
                    • Never leave cooked eggs or egg dishes out of the refrigerator for more than 2 hours or for more than 1 hour when temperatures are above 90° F. Bacteria that can cause illness grow quickly at warm temperatures (between 40° F and 140° F).
                    • For party planning, keep hot egg dishes hot and cold egg dishes cold:
                      • Keep egg dishes refrigerated until time to serve.
                      • Serve small platters of reheated egg dishes at a time to ensure the food stays at the proper temperature. Replenish as needed, or at least every 2 hours.
                      • Keep cold egg dishes on ice if they are going to stay out longer than 2 hours.

                      Transporting

                      • For picnics, pack cooked eggs and egg dishes in an insulated cooler with enough ice or frozen gel packs to keep them cold. Transport the cooler in the passenger compartment of the car, not in the much warmer trunk. At the picnic area, put the cooler in the shade if possible and keep the lid closed as much as you can.
                      • For school or work, pack cooked eggs with a small frozen gel pack or a frozen juice box.

                      About Foodborne Illness

                      Know the Symptoms

                      Consuming dangerous foodborne bacteria will usually cause illness within 1 to 3 days of eating the contaminated food. However, sickness can also occur within 20 minutes or up to 6 weeks later. Although most people will recover from a foodborne illness within a short period of time, some can develop chronic, severe, or even life-threatening health problems. Foodborne illness can sometimes be confused with other illnesses that have similar symptoms. The symptoms of foodborne illness can include:

                      • Vomiting, diarrhea, and abdominal pain
                      • Flu-like symptoms, such as fever, headache, and body ache

                      Take Action

                      If you think that you or a family member has a foodborne illness, contact your healthcare provider immediately. Also, report the suspected foodborne illness to FDA in either of these ways:

                      • Contact the Consumer Complaint Coordinator in your area.
                      • Contact MedWatch, FDA’s Safety Information and Adverse Event Reporting Program:
                        By Phone: 1-800-FDA-1088
                        Online: File a voluntary report at http://www.fda.gov/medwatch